Living a Dream: Back to SML

So, today, I’m going to catch a ferry out to the Shoals Marine Lab. I’m just going to be out for a day to meet with the undergrad intern I’m mentoring. I’ll be back later this summer to work with her and setup some permanent monitoring transects.

I have to be honest, this is one of those moments in my life where I am watching a dream come through. I went to SML in the summer of 1999 to take some classes. It changed everything for me. I cannot recount the number of paths that opened up due to that summer than I have run down, higgledy-piggledy. To return now as a mentor and researcher? To have the chance to really learn the secrets of the sea around the Isles of Shoals? To come back with new eyes after a decade of developing as a scientist? I’m having a hard time expressing my excitement and joy.

Rather than kvell any more about the place and my excitement, here’s a video from the participants of the Underwater Research Course at SML (which, also, totally formative to who I am as a scientist – thanks, Jim!) I think it conveys a lot of what I could say, but in images and video that’s much more telling.

Best Peer Review Experience Ever

So, I recently submitted a piece regarding the future of scholarly publishing in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Simultaneous to posting, I put up a preprint in PeerJ Preprints and also put it on Google Docs for line by line commentary (which you are welcome to give!). I asked in both places that commenters identify themselves, unless they felt deeply uncomfortable.

OMG the experience has been amazing!

At PeerJ you can comment on the main page of the article, and others can rate it – which is fantastic – and I’ve gotten some wonderful feedback there (thanks Lars!)

The Google Doc experience has been even more fascinating, given the ability to put in line by line comments.

One of our reviewers is using the Google Doc for their comments. It has made it easy to see what they are saying, respond to things that I think are relevant (or I’ll just change some of the text in the next draft for bigger changes), and have an interactive experience with the reviewer. It absolutely fabulous.

I’ve been really fascinated by the idea of how collaboration can improve peer review ever since reading Leek et al.’s 2011 piece Cooperation between Referees and Authors Increases Peer Review Accuracy. I’m delighted that one of our reviewers has embraced that ethos, and in so doing, I can see how this will really help with future publications if not just Ross Mounce, but everyone embraced this model. Very cool!

A Preprint Experiment: Four Pillars and a Foundation for the Future of Scholarly Publishing

x-post from the OpenPub Project blog

So, we got together, had two working group meetings to discuss the future of scholarly publishing in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and the Earth and Ocean Sciences. What were were thinking that entire time?

We’ve just submitted a piece that brings together our broad ideas (some of which have been seen before), but, simultaneous to publication, we’ve also decided to put up a preprint. Why? Simply put, immediate access is one of our four pillars of the future of scholarly publication. Once you feel something is ready for public consumption, put it out there! We’ve been delighted to watch the evolution of PeerJ Preprints, so we’ve placed our piece there.

Byrnes et al. (2013) The four pillars of scholarly publishing: The future and a foundation. PeerJ PrePrints 1:e11 http://dx.doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.11

This immediate access to the piece goes hand in hand with another of our four pillars. Open Review. We want to know what you think. And now. We hope you give us feedback over at the preprint. Or, if you want to give us more detailed annotated comment, we’ve put it in a comment-open Google doc. Highlight something you disagree with. Argue with us. We welcome it! We’d ask that you put your name with the comment. We want a discussion, as discussion will improve this manuscript and help us shape our argument rather than just one-way commenting. This will also allow *you* to get full recognition for your comments, and we will include this in future acknowledgements.

So, enjoy the piece – our commentary is not a straight experiment-analysis-discussion piece, but rather part of a broader ecosystem of scholarly products that we feel are important to get out there. We look forward to hearing what you think of the piece!